UK economy, Wage

UK set for worst wage growth since the 1920s, Labour research finds

“Even with this year’s increase in the minimum wage, the Tories will have overseen the slowest pay growth in a century and the third slowest since the 1860s,” he said. George Osborne has justified cuts to in-work benefits by arguing that the government is transitioning the UK from being “a low-wage, high-welfare economy to a… Continue reading UK set for worst wage growth since the 1920s, Labour research finds

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UKLeader

Congratulations

''Who can now seriously claim that young people aren’t interested in politics or that there is no appetite for a new kind of politics? Above all, it has shown that millions of people want a real alternative, not business as usual, either inside or outside the Labour party. The hope of change and bringing big ideas in is now back at the centre of politics: ending austerity, tackling inequality, working for peace and social justice at home and abroad. That’s why the Labour party was founded more than a century ago.'' This election has given that founding purpose a new force for the 21st century: a Labour party that gives voice to the 99%.''

inequality, UK economy

Income distribution: Inequality in GREAT Britain

The UK today is one of the developed world’s most unequal nations, with the richest 1,000 people owning more wealth than 40% of the population, or 25.6 million people. Inequality has stretched our society to breaking point, with vast material differences creating huge social distances. It’s why over 80% of people are now concerned about the gap between rich and poor, and why even billionaires such as Bill Gates and Warren Buffett have voiced concerns over inequality. But inequality isn’t inevitable, it can be reversed. For this to happen we need our politicians to commit to its reduction.

Insurance, UK economy

Car insurers charge ‘eye-watering’ fees

Some car insurance companies are charging "eye-watering" fees on top of annual premiums, according to the consumer organisation. It found that some insurance companies charged up to £75 for cancelling a policy - even in the cooling-off period. Others charge £50 to renew a policy or £30 for duplicate documents.